Meetings

Voices from the Sangha: Hannah Joan

,
by Hannah Joan, Syracuse, NY

We started in May 2017. The story of how we started began in September 2016 when I woke up in my car; not an unusual thing to happen to me seeing as I had an alcohol problem, but because I also had an eating disorder I was often drinking instead of eating.

That morning I woke up and said, “This is it.”

I wasn’t sure how to get better but I started practicing yoga every day and reading “Dharma Punx”. So much of Noah’s life was like mine, except I was raised in an abusive Baptist church household. The start of healing seemed to really happen when I connected my breath to my yoga poses. This turned into practicing my breath and feeling my body tone in meditation. I didn’t know what I was doing but I knew I felt better and started to accept and sit with the fact that I was an alcoholic and needed to get control of my eating disorder or I would die.

September 2016 was the last time I drank. I went to an outpatient clinic for six months. The whole time I felt a call to share the experience I felt from staying aware of my breath and body tone. I could tell when I would get a craving or when I wanted to run away from what I was feeling, before the thought came to my mind.

I soon ordered “Refuge Recovery”, and was so overwhelmed with the need to share this crazy secret that had changed my life. I searched for places to start a meeting, stayed patient and continued growing in my practice. One day I got a message from a woman named Ashley, who was working at Prevention Network. She wanted to ask me about this Buddhist Path to Recovery I was living. We met, she loved it, and offered me space for free to start a meeting!

May 2017 was our first meeting. I never had expectations. I thought, “Even if it is just me sitting alone, I will do that.” However, this didn’t happen. That first meeting had six people in it and today we are now at 15 people every Sunday morning. I do not pride myself that these beautiful people are finding their true selves. I am just loving them along the way.

The practice of mindfulness and non-attachment has transformed my life and I love seeing the light in others faces when they experience this freedom too. I was a punk drunk, anorexic, angry, suicidal, fighter most of my life. I truly am thankful for the whole community around the world involved in Refuge Recovery. Syracuse has a very bad heroin scene and it’s not getting better, so I am blessed to be able to offer something else. I couldn’t go to church for AA because I shut down when I went inside one, ptsd and anxiety blocked any sort of positivity that aa could have brought me.

So, we meet every Sunday morning at 10am, at 906 Spencer St, Syracuse, NY. I am also planning on starting a second meeting very soon. It’s truly amazing how all of this happened and it’s humbling to be able to share after years of anger.

Voices from the Sangha: Cassie Lee

,

An interview with the creator of the Refuge Recovery Starter Kit

Cassie Lee is the creator of the Refuge Recovery New Meeting Starter Kits. She agreed to sit down with Sangha Spotlight to discuss recovery, kits, and the appropriate weather for dinosaurs.

Tell me a little about yourself?

I’m 35, I currently live in Las Vegas but originally from Detroit. I’ve been a vegetarian for 24 years. I’m happiest on a scenic drive somewhere remote with the windows down and a mixtape on blast. I love animals- especially my 10-year-old woof named Luca. I do photo gigs for families and businesses as a side hustle. Currently, I have the pleasure living with my older brother, his wife, and their son Andrew- who is 3 years old and my best friend. Living with them has allowed me to see exactly what kind of family I would love to have of my own in the future. Read more

Voices from the Sangha: Marjorie Redmond

,

An interview with a Detroit mover and shaker

Tell me a little about yourself? (age, location, occupation, hobbies, etc..)

As I start to answer I recognize a familiar story, about how my story doesn’t fit, how I don’t fit, how as an old timer in recovery I’m barely relevant to the younger people who are finding refuge in Refuge Recovery. The good news is that because of Refuge and a meditation practice I move from the virtual reality that lives in my head to a real reality that lives somewhere in the heart/mind/gut of my life.

Read more

Sangha Spotlight: New York City

,
By Rosy N. NYC

As I type this I’m still pretty blissed out from the DharmaPunx retreat this past weekend with teachers: Josh Korda, Kathy Cherry and Melissa McKay up at Won Dharma Center. Wow. That was sublime. Even though it’s been ages since I’ve taken hallucinogens, I coulda sworn I was tripping as soon as I got there because the place was one step beyond amazing and I was already giddy about spending the weekend with the teachers who have turned my life upside down in the best possible way. Two ‘new-ish’ Refuge Recovery regulars, Jay and Nik, road up with me to the DPX too. Oh and Leah (who I had never met but had been texting about RR mentorship a few days earlier) just happened to be my roommate. WTF. Holy kismet.

I’m so glad I went but it was a tough call because Refuge Recovery NYC was having our fall daylong retreat at Jewel Heart Center on the same Saturday– Talk about an embarrassment of riches! The theme of the retreat was the Five Remembrances (fitting with Halloween just a few weeks away, no?). By all accounts, it was a fan-fucking-tastic retreat with many new faces. After the daylong ended, people couldn’t get enough Refuge so a big contingent went to the Saturday Manhattan meeting together.

The Saturday night meeting was the first for NYC, which Chance started about three years and ago. Within the last year, four more have sprung up in Manhattan and Brooklyn and we’re hoping for more in New York State in general. James and I did a workshop about Refuge Recovery at the New York State Recovery Conference in Albany earlier in the month. The people were excited and we felt like rock stars. Who knew a conference in Albany could be so much fun?!

The NYCRR crew is great at having fun. Together we have holiday potlucks, summer picnics, movie outings, museum excursions, foot massages after protesting, and the trip to LA with Chance, Dan, James, Bernard, and Noam for Refcon3 was super special. We’re also there to support each with everyday life shit by making each other grapefruit kombucha, moving cars for street cleaning, bringing over Advil after dental work (so much fucking oral surgery in sobriety), schlepping progeny from Brooklyn to Manhattan when in a jam, and generally just covering for each other. Like the city where we live, we are a diverse lot. A mixed bag of people recovering from codependency, internet addiction, eating disorders, over-exercising as well as the run-of-the-mill alcoholic and/or drug addict, we do our best to be inclusive of all humans (and yes, we ask people to state their gender pronouns after they say their name at the beginning of each meeting).

We’re just getting started here, but growing quickly (even if we’re a little slower on getting all the peoples organized for intersangha stuffs). If you want to connect with us, you can find us at:
RefugeRecoveryNYC.org
facebook.com/groups/RRNYC
We’d love to see you!

Bee’s Books

,
by Bee Sloan

When I first got sober, all I knew was that I didn’t want to die this way. For the first time I understood that drinking was really going to kill me. Not that I didn’t want to die; because I did, but then a nurse told me, “You don’t want to die THAT way. It’s a really ugly way to go.” Finally this message penetrated my fogged brain and I became ready to do whatever it took to get sober. And as I did the work of early recovery, I became more and more willing to live, to learn about my true nature, and to do the work to become the person I was meant to be.

These are the books that helped me most, my first year. There are many more, which I hope to share with you in future newsletters:

  1. “Refuge Recovery: A Buddhist Path to Recovering from Addiction” Noah Levine
  2. “Against the Stream” Noah Levine
  3. “The Heart of the Revolution” Noah Levine
  4. “Buddhism and the Twelve Steps Workbook” Kevin Griffin
  5. “One Breath at a Time: Buddhism and the Twelve Steps” Kevin Griffin
  6. “The Twelve-Step Buddhist: Enhance Recovery from Any Addiction” Darren Littlejohn
  7. “Buddhism: A Very Short Introduction” Damien Keown
  8. “The Recovery Book: Answers to All Your Questions About Addiction and Alcoholism” A.J. Mooney

And finally, strangely enough, “My Stroke of Insight” by Jill Bolte Taylor, an inspirational story of a woman’s stroke and recovery, written from her own point of view as a neuroscientist. I learned a lot about how the brain heals from this book. It was recommended to me by my nurse at Hazelden.